blaz1k3n:

Even though I’m still crying, I’m laughing remembering Mako’s face when he finally won against Ming Hua

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"You mean"

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"If I had just used my LIGHTNING bending"

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"In a fight against a WATER bender"

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"I’d have fucking fried her already"

Good going detective Republic City is in safe hands

jncera:

if bolin doesn’t turn to opal at some point and say “i lava you” i am going to be extremely disappointed 

things-that-are-not-very-cool:

You just sneezed…and flew ten feet in the air.

I needed to draw some P’li…

Actual footage of P’li sneezing.

equalpartsscienceandwonder:

yonceyall:

all of these are very important

YES I AM ALL ABOUT THIS

(Source: etoilesdelanuit, via greatblueworld)

artbymoga:

promising-promises:

princesssugarbutt:

So yeah I can see how many fingers you’re holding up

THIS IS VERY ACCURATE

THIS IS VERY BEAUTIFUL

(Source: fullheartedly, via greatblueworld)

darlinghogwarts:

If James and Lily had survived, I am positive that every time Harry got into trouble, there would be a huge betting pool on whether the next howler would be James and Sirius congratulating him or Lily screaming at him and commanding Severus to give him detention for a month. And as the Potter family owl would arrive, everyone would be silently anticipating the results, and at the end you’d see dumbledore discretely handing mcgonagall 10 galleons

(via greatblueworld)

supermegagardevoir:

THUNDERSTORMS ARE PERFECT OPPORTUNITIES TO CUDDLE.
WHAT IF THE POWER GOES OUT.
LETS MAKE A FORT.
DID LIGHTNING JUST SHOOT THROUGH OUR WINDOW?
IDK.
LETS MAKE OUT.

(via greatblueworld)

whovian-all-over:

ohyousillypotato:

And here we can see the Blogger in her natural habitat.

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The blogger is a shy, docile creature…

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… that prefers the darkness…

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… and tends to be wary of the outside world.

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The Blogger rarely sleeps, and when it does, it does so in seemingly random places.image

We have attempted to understand the dietary habits of the Blogger…

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… but to no avail.

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I am so glad this is back

(Source: mechapuppy, via greatblueworld)

wishuponastardis:

Special skills: extensive Harry Potter knowledge, can watch an entire TV show in a week, knows words to every Disney song, can form abnormally strong attachments to fictional characters, Microsoft Word

(via greatblueworld)

"

Far fewer articles describe the other constitutional violations taking place on the streets of Missouri, and those violations are every bit as urgent as the infringements on speech and assembly. We’ve seen very little coverage of the use of tear gas and rubber bullets as constitutional violations. But the due process clause bans the police from using excessive force even when they are within their rights to control a crowd or arrest a suspect. And tear gas is in a category all its own. Not only is unleashing it into a crowd an unconstitutional exercise of excessive force, but its use is banned by international law. That’s one of the reasons Amnesty International sent a team of investigators to Ferguson. Similarly, the use of rubber bullets under the circumstances is also unconstitutional. Some kinds of rubber bullets are more unconstitutional than others, because certain types are more likely to injure and maim.

But excessive use of force is only the beginning. Pulling people out of the crowd and arresting them without probable cause (or for being 2 feet off the sidewalk) violates the Fourth and 14th Amendments, particularly when those arrests are disproportionately of black protesters. The general arrest statistics in Ferguson reveal what looks to be a stunning constitutional problem. According to an annual report last year from the Missouri attorney general’s office, Ferguson police were twice as likely to arrest blacks during traffic stops as they were whites. Emerging reports about racial disparities in Ferguson’s criminal justice system and the ways in which the town uses trivial violations by blacks to bankroll the city (and disenfranchise offenders) all represent constitutional questions. Why don’t we characterize them as such? These are not just violations of the law or bad policy. These are violations of our most basic and fundamental civil liberties.

Of course, probably the biggest potential constitutional violation of all—and eyewitness testimony suggests this as a real possibility—is the alleged use of excessive force by the police in shooting an unarmed 18-year-old at least six times. Under the law, each of those bullets must be separately justified, as necessary, even if one believes the officer’s story that Michael Brown rushed him. To be sure, the news media has covered this, but very few of us talk about the shooting as a potential violation of the Constitution. Remember, the Constitution is the foundational bargain between the people and their government, the framework on which our legal order rests. When we fail to talk about the arrests, searches, racial profiling, and government brutality in constitutional terms, we are failing to capture how profoundly the state has betrayed its promises.

"

Ferguson’s constitutional crisis: First Amendment violations are only part of the story.  (via pipeworks)

(via greatblueworld)

dayman-ah-ah-ah:

This isn’t freedom. This is fear.

Captain America is so relevant right now

(Source: lieutenant-casey, via greatblueworld)